10.06.2016
policy

FBI Admits 1 Million-Plus Arrests for ‘Breathing While High’ in 2015

And it's not catch and release they're talking about.

Anyone who has ever been in couple’s therapy has heard about priorities and how important they are. So don’t be surprised if America’s crime fighters, who made 1,249,025 arrests in 2015 for the crime of wanting to be high, are headed for a divorce.

Justice may not be always blind or swift or certain, but it sure has been busy. According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program, the United States recorded 10,797,088 total arrests last year.

In more than one-half million interactions last year, law-enforcement personnel could have been doing something more productive with their time, even if those pot-busting hours were spent reading a book and eating two doughnuts.

These infractions include murder (11,092) and property crimes (1,463,213) and drunk driving (1,089,171), and are topped by what the FBI categorizes as arrests for “drug abuse.” The country’s 1,488,707 “drug abuse” busts do include sales, manufacture, and trafficking, but 83.9 percent of those drug-related pinches were for possession alone, with 574,641 drug arrests inflicted for simply holding weed.

The obvious conclusion to be drawn from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report is that in more than one-half million interactions last year, law-enforcement personnel could have been doing something more productive with their time, even if those pot-busting hours were spent reading a book and eating two doughnuts.

Beyond quantifying the reality of pointless marijuana arrests, the FBI data raises a fundamental question regarding drug possession and the struggle with substance dependence in the United States: Why, you can't help ask regarding 296,252 cases of heroin, opiate, and cocaine arrest, are cops and narcs the best America has to offer on the harm-reduction front lines?

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